We think the world around us is absolutely fascinating. Understanding and affecting how it works through science and technology is incredibly rewarding. We love looking at a subject from slightly unconventional angles to make it more understandable.

We do this directly by writing and performing science shows and by generating written explanations of phenomena, and indirectly by designing and building science demos and hands-on science exhibits.

Science Exhibits

Complete circuits using your body and see the currents flowing through the exhibit.
The boom-whacker or pipes of pan exhibit is an old favorite. Tune a series of pipes to different notes and the musical visitor hits the tubes to play a tune. We have added a tune guide to make it easier to use.
Interrupt a laser beam and you can produce clicks, pull a piece of mesh or patterned fabric across it, and you can make notes, play tunes, or even produce speech.
Image of sea ice exhibit
We've all heard lots about the loss of polar sea ice over time. This exhibit allows gallery visitors to see it for themselves. With the ability to select the month and the year, changes in sea ice extent can be displayed on a projector or screen, showing how the ice changes month by month, or for a particular month over back to 1850. Depressing, but important.

Science Demonstrations

A set of rubens tubes tuned like a set of organ pipes, so different tubes will hit resonance at different pitches, so as you scan the frequency the resonance will move between the pipes.
A model train pushed along by the pressure of the air from a centrifugal pump to model a historical underground post railway in London.
A stick that will display the current passing through a circuit made of a group of people as a flow of lights.
A lightweight low friction spinning chair that you can do angular momentum experiments with, and play with gyroscopes.

Science Shows

A high-energy, high-demo whistle-stop tour of the development of lighting technologies.
How do we make light? What is colour? Why do newspapers have strange coloured spots at the edges? Find out in our light show.
What is electricity? How is it generated? How does it relate to a microwave, and what has this all got to do with Greek cats and leg hair? Watch our electricity show to find out.
A brief trip around the science of gasses, what happens if you squash then, stretch them, heat them and cool them. Involving liquid nitrogen, and our infamous repeating vacuum bazookas.

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